Green Farming
Bi-monthly Journal
NAAS RATING : 4.38
UGC Approved Jr.No. : 45500
ISSN 0974-0775
International Journal of Applied Agricultural & Horticultural Sciences
  • 22 October, 2017
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Innovative Eco-Safe Agri-Horticulture Technology for Greener Environment, Global Energy & Food Security.
Vol. 8 (3) : May-June 2017 issue
Green Farming Vol. 8 (3) : 559-565 ; May-June, 2017
Effect of row ratios, phosphorus levels and weed management practices on weed population, growth and yield attributes of mustard – chickpea intercropping system
V.P. GAIKWADa1*, J.J. PATELb2 and B.D. PATELc3
aDepartment of Agronomy, Dr. D.Y. Patil, College of Agriculture, Talsande, Kolhapur - 416 122 (Maharashtra)
bDepartment of Agronomy, cAICRP-Weed Management, B.A. College of Agriculture, Anand Agricultural University, Anand - 388 110 (Gujarat)
Designation :  
1Asstt. Professor *(vaibhavgaikwad22@gmail.com), 2Retd. Professor, 3Agronomist and PI
Subject : Agronomy and Crop Production
Paper No. : P-6024
Total Pages : 7
Received : 14 September 2016
Revised accepted : 04 March 2017
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Citation :

V.P. GAIKWAD, J.J. PATEL and B.D. PATEL. 2017. Effect of row ratios, phosphorus levels and weed management practices on weed population, growth and yield attributes of mustard – chickpea intercropping system. Green Farming Vol. 8 (3) : 559-565 ; May-June, 2017

ABSTRACT
A study was initiated during rabi 2010 -2011 and 2011-2012 at the College Agronomy Farm, B.A. College of Agriculture, Anand Agricultural University, Anand, Gujarat to study the effect of row ratios, phosphorus levels and weed management practices on performance of mustard- chickpea intercropping and its residual effect on summer black gram under middle Gujarat conditions. Different row ratios had significant influence on the monocot weed count during 25 DAS while it did not exerted significant influence on monocot, dicot weed count and weed dry weight during 25, 50 DAS and at harvest, respectively. The highest plant height of mustard (30.89 cm, 204.83 and 213.94 cm) were recorded under the treatment IC5 Mustard + Chickpea (1:3) and IC2 (sole mustard), respectively at 30, 90 DAS and at harvest and the maximum plant height (41.81 cm) of chickpea was observed under the treatment IC3 Mustard + Chickpea (1:1) on pooled result as well as lowest plant height (33.72cm) was recorded under the treatment IC1 sole chickpea and It had non-significant effect on pooled basis result at 25 DAS and at harvest. Different phosphorus levels did not differ significantly for plant height of mustard and chickpea on pooled basis. Weed management practices also did not exert its significant difference on plant height chickpea. The highest plant height of mustard (213.63 cm) was observed under the treatment W2 (HW at 20 and 40 DAS) while lowest plant height of mustard at harvest (206.88 cm) was observed under the treatment W2 (HW at 20 and 40 DAS). Different row ratios did not exert its significant influenced on number of siliquae and length of siliquae per plant on pooled basis analysis while harvest index and test weight had significant effect on harvest index as well as test weight were observed under the treatment IC3 Mustard + Chickpea (1:1). Lower harvest index as well as test weight were observed under the treatment IC5 Mustard + Chickpea (1:3). The highest number of pods per plant (53.55 cm) and number of seeds per pods (1.67) of chickpea on pooled basis. Significantly less number of pods per plant (27.76) and seeds per pod (1.52) was observed under the treatment IC5 Mustard + chickpea (1:3). The treatment IC3 Mustard + Chickpea (1:1) ranked first by recording significantly higher values of test weight (25.63 gm) on the pooled basis which was remained at par with the IC 1 (sole chickpea). Significantly the lowest test weight (24.71 gm) was noted under the treatment IC5 Mustard + Chickpea (1: 3).
The highest mustard and chickpea seed yield (1440 kg ha-1 and 809 kg ha-1), straw yield of mustard and dry gotar yield of chickpea (3960 kg ha-1 and 1678 kg ha-1) and oil content (35.5 %) were recorded under the treatment IC1 (Sole chickpea) and IC3 (Mustard + Chickpea (1:1)), respectively. While different row ratios had non-significant effect on the protein content on chickpea. The response of the phosphorus was observed up to 50 kg P2O5 kg ha-1. Significantly the highest mustard and chickpea seed yield (1353 kg ha-1 and 561 kg ha-1) , oil content (35.32 %) and protein content (22.2%) were noted under the treatment P1 (25 kg P2O5 ha-1) and P2 (50 kg P2O5 ha-1), respectively. The highest mustard seed yield (1396 kg ha-1), chickpea seed (566 kg ha-1) yield and straw yield of mustard (3828 kg ha-1) were recorded under the treatment W3 (pendimethalin@1 kg a.i. ha-1), respectively. While different weed management practices had non-significant influence on oil and protein content as well as dry gotar yield of mustard and chickpea, respectively.
Key words :
Chickpea, Intercropping system, Mustard, Row ratios, Protein, Siliquae, Straw yield, Weed dry weight.